Workaround: “Unable to Change Virtual Machine Power State: Cannot Find a Valid Peer Process to Connect to”

My Problem

Attempting to start a virtual machine in VMware Workstation 15 Pro (15.0.3) on a RedHat based Linux workstation caused the following error: “Unable to Change Virtual Machine Power State: Cannot Find a Valid Peer Process to Connect to”

I was able to start other virtual machines in the VM library, however.

My Workaround

Note that this is simply a workaround. I don’t yet know the ultimate cause, but I’m documenting how I workaround it until I or someone else can figure out the ultimate cause of this problem.

First, check to see if the virtual machine is actually running, in spite of there being no visual indicators within VMware Workstation: vmrun list

You’ll probably see that the virtual machine is running. If you don’t, then this workaround isn’t likely to help you. Attempt to shut the running virtual machine down softly: vmrun stop /path/to/virtual_machine.vmx soft

After that, you should be able to start the machine again, until the next time it crashes for unknown reasons. More news as I discover it.

Dumping Grounds (Turn Back Now):

I’ll dump some of my notes here and they’ll be updated periodically as I find out more info about this issue. You’re completely safe to ignore everything past this point. Abandon all hope, ye who proceed.

I had recently upgraded from Fedora 29 to Fedora 30, and was experiencing some minor instability with my main workstation. I’m not sure if that was the ultimate cause of this issue, but I’m suspicious since I never had this issue until after the upgrade.

My first act was to go to the Help menu, select the “Support” menu and then “Collect Support Data‚Ķ” I chose to collect data for the specific VM that was having this issue. This took quite a while, by my standards. About 20 minutes. It basically creates a giant zipped dump of pertinent files across your physical machine that pertain to VMware and that specific virtual machine. It’s not super easy to parse and know what to look for.

I searched through /var/log/vmware/ for any clues in any of the log files found therein. Grepping for all files that had the pertinent virtual machine’s name, and looking for surrounding context didn’t turn anything up.

I attempted to start the vmware-workstation-server service but that failed. I don’t think that’s the issue since the virtual machine isn’t a shared VM.

I tried vmrun list and saw that the Windows VM was actually listed as running. I stopped it soft: vmrun stop /path/to/my/virtual_machine.vmx soft and was then able to start the virtual machine. I’m not sure what’s causing the crash, and what’s causing the crash of VMware Workstation Pro, and why when I start it back up it doesn’t appear to know that the VM it was previously working with is actually running.